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Academic Affairs - Center for Service and Learning

1) How are you dealing with the projected base budget reductions for 2009-10 and 2010-11? For instance, how will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students, faculty, and staff? Will some planned initiatives have to be delayed or terminated?
Our plan is to reduce the amount of programming support for faculty development, predominantly directed at service learning.  Our current level of services for faculty development programs include a number of initiatives (e.g., Boyer Scholars, Faculty Community Scholars, Faculty Liaisons, course development stipends) and we will review the impact of each program this spring and make adjustments. Since the campus provides course development funds for the R.I.S.E. initiative, we will no longer fund service learning course development on an individual basis.

Academic Affairs - Center for Teaching and Learning

1) How are you dealing with the projected base budget reductions for 2009-10 and 2010-11? For instance, how will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students, faculty, and staff? Will some planned initiatives have to be delayed or terminated?

·         We are aggressively writing proposals to federal funding agencies. We recently received a grant from the National Science Foundation which has provided some salary savings.

·         We have salary savings from 2008-2009 which we will use for unexpected expenses and to sponsor some of the CTL programs.

·         We have not replaced a half-time staff position after the staff member resigned.

·         We have reduced travel for CTL staff.

·         In general, we have reduced serving refreshments at events sponsored by CTL.

·         We are actively looking for cosponsors for major CTL events.


Academic Affairs - Community Learning Network

1) How are you dealing with the projected base budget reductions for 2009-10 and 2010-11? For instance, how will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students, faculty, and staff? Will some planned initiatives have to be delayed or terminated?

1).     CLN  is dealing with base reductions by not filling vacancies and restructuring our fiscal office and continuing education programming staff.  In addition, CLN is hiring part-time staff with no benefits instead of full-time staff with benefits.

2). CLN current level of services to students, faculty , and staff was effected.   CLN was asked to open two off campus sites without funding for staffing.

3). No, planned initiaitves have been delayed or terminated.   CLN is moving ahead on the 3 planned initiaitves with grant funding supporting the development of the P-20 initiative; workforce education; amd off campus center development.


Academic Affairs - Enrollment Services & Registrar

1) How are you dealing with the projected base budget reductions for 2009-10 and 2010-11? For instance, how will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students, faculty, and staff? Will some planned initiatives have to be delayed or terminated?

The Enrollment Services offices have undertaken a number of steps toward reducing our expenditures.  Staff positions have remained unfilled and 3 staff have left as a result of initiation of the reduction in force process or progressive discipline processes.  Saturday service hours have been eliminated for the Office of the Registrar and Student Financial Aid Services.  The Office of Student Scholarships will reduce weekday service hours beginning January 4.  Unfortunately, reduction of staff also means that we have had to reduce the number of student employees.

 

Travel, except for recruitment purposes, has been drastically reduced.  The negative consequences are that our staff are not able to attend conferences where information is shared on processes to improve the function of the offices and provide innovative services.

 

Over the past 3 years, each of the areas with substantive processing responsibilities (Registrar, Admissions, and Financial Aid) has undertaken reviews to improve efficiencies within these areas.  As a result, each area has been able to handle the increases in student enrollment without an increase in the number of staff involved. 

 

While we are committed to attempting to continue providing requested services for the academic units, further reductions will mean that our responses may not be as timely as in the past.


Academic Affairs - Faculty Appointments and Advancement

1) How are you dealing with the projected base budget reductions for 2009-10 and 2010-11? For instance, how will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students, faculty, and staff? Will some planned initiatives have to be delayed or terminated?

The FAA budget has no room for reductions. All but a small amount of money for S & E for office operations is devoted to essential personnel to keep the faculty hiring process and core faculty development programing in place (new faculty orientation, Plater Institute, promotion and tenure workshops, academic leadership development and updates of academic inititatives). This last year we secured $10,000 of dedicated programing money through reallocation from the former consortium centers and Dean Sukhatme.  This funding gives us modest support for programing that is sufficient due to our efficiency.

IUPUI has the same number of faculty as the Bloomington campus and we process equal numbers of E-doc transactions with two personnel wheras Bloomington employs six. Thus, we have no margin for further reductions.       


Academic Affairs - Graduate Office

1) How are you dealing with the projected base budget reductions for 2009-10 and 2010-11? For instance, how will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students, faculty, and staff? Will some planned initiatives have to be delayed or terminated?

For 2009-2010, we budgeted less for travel than in previous years.  No staff will be supported at conferences and we are limiting out-of-state recruiting to key partner institutions.  Actual costs are expected to fall below budgeted amounts.  We are also holding below budgeted amounts for outside publications and hospitality.  To lower staff costs, we converted our student hourly worker to work study; when that student resigns at the end of January, we will hold the position open for a period of time to generate salary savings.  We have also held open the second graduate assistant position since the incumbent graduated in December; it is unlikely that we will fill this position.

The changes noted above will damage our ability to recruit most effectively but we will rely upon previously established relationships to try to operate at distance and still recruit from our key partner institutions.  The impact of losing our student hourly worker will be that the office staff will have to pick up receptionist duties in addition to their other duties, which will impair efficiency and timeliness of completion of required tasks.  In addition, this student was key to converting paper files to electronic files; this project will remain on hold until adequate staff time can be found to assign this task.  Our goal was to eliminate most paper files before the Graduate Office moves from the Union, and thus save moving costs.

For 2010-2011, we are planning to limit to one graduate assistant and to save money by supporting an in-state student, rather than an international student or out-of-state student.  In addition, we will drop the $14,000 CIC minority group membership fee; it can be picked up by another office at IUPUI or the campus can elect to operate outside the CIC group.

The changes noted for 2010-2011 will damage our ability to operate a first-class summer program for recruiting into our graduate programs.  We will try to ameliorate the damage by accepting fewer students and by placing a greater burden upon the Assistant Dean in the Graduate Office; we are also developing an MOU with CRL to help define responsibilities for these programs, which may identify synergies that can partly offset the limitations created by the budget shortfall.  Restricting our hiring to an in-state student will unavoidably damage the international initiative of the campus.  Minority recruiting efforts will continue within the Graduate Office but the resources of the CIC will be missed, if the campus elects not to pick up the fee.  We will monitor minority enrollments to attempt to assess the level of damage caused by the separation from the CIC, should it occur.  Finally, if the in-house graduate application is implemented, the Graduate Office will save all AY fees, which amounts to about $2500 yearly; this change should have no impact on our ability to carry out core functions.


Academic Affairs - International Affairs

1) How are you dealing with the projected base budget reductions for 2009-10 and 2010-11? For instance, how will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students, faculty, and staff? Will some planned initiatives have to be delayed or terminated?

IUPUI Office of International Affairs

Annual Planning and Budgeting Report 2009-2010

 

Additional questionHow are you dealing with the projected base budget reductions for 2009-10 and 2010-11?  For instance, how will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students, faculty, and staff? Will some planned initiatives have to be delayed or terminated?

 

The OIA is responding to the budget reductions with a multi-pronged strategy, as follows.

 

1) Substantial cuts in travel expenditures.

 

Travel is essential to the work of the OIA (to recruit students; cultivate and advance international partnerships; organize and oversee study abroad programs; position IUPUI within the national and global arena of internationalization; and maintain the cutting-edge knowledge of visa regulations, admissions practices, and the global trends in higher education necessary for guiding IUPUI’s international activities).

 

The OIA nevertheless began making significant cuts in its travel expenditures prior to the university reductions mandated in August 2009.  More specifically, the OIA is looking at a $40,000 reduction in travel expenditures by:

  • Cutting in half the number of staff attending professional conferences
  • Restricting in-state mileage reimbursements
  • Cutting the standard per diem reimbursements for international travel by 25%.

 

2) Reassigning OIA income to cover cuts in essential  staff positions.

 

For some time now, 40% of the OIA base budget has come from income generated by application and visa services fees, as well as per capita rent payment for students studying English at the ELS Language Center on the IUPUI campus.   In some years this income enabled us to just squeak by; in others it provided funding for new endeavors, such as new staff to match growing student numbers, and support for faculty and school international initiatives.  This income is folded into the base budget projections of the OIA.

 

In 2009-10, the OIA received enough such income to cover the loss of 50% of the funding of two important staff positions (a cut of approximately $60,000 in total).  This has, however, necessitated reducing the use of this income for other activities including both basic office operations and new initiatives.  The two positions thus salvaged were a) an international processing position that had been refilled just before the new policy on vacant positions was announced but which nevertheless fell under the 50% cut policy; and the loss of 50% funding for another admissions processing position that had been provided by the Kelley Direct program prior to the administrative move of Kelley Direct to IUB.

 

The OIA has now reached the point, however, where there is no more play in its base income, especially since there has been a nation-wide decline in enrollments in intensive English learning centers such as ELS due to the global recession. (The number of international students pursuing degrees in the U.S. has remained healthy, but the number simply pursuing English language acquisition has declined.)

 

3) Substantial cuts to the operating budget of the Center on Southeast Asia.

 

Over the next two years, we are contemplating reducing the $30,000 budget of the CSEA by as much as $20,000.  Some of this will be compensated for by starting to spend the earnings on the CSEA’s foundation account (which heretofore has always been plowed back into the account in the hopes of building up enough for a faculty position).  Even with use of this account, there will nevertheless be a reduction in the CSEA’s ability to support new school and faculty initiatives.

 

4) Substantial cuts to the OIA’s Special Fund for Supporting New International Development Initiatives (IDEV).

 

The OIA is contemplating a reassignment of these monies to basic operating expenses, thereby reducing the OIA’s ability to support new School and faculty initiatives.  The $25,000 fund may be cut by as much as $15,000.

 

5) Cuts in hours the OIA Front Desk is open for walk-in student/scholar queries.

               

We are contemplating reducing the Front Desk hours from 40 to 30 per week, thereby reducing hourly staff costs by $10,000 annually.  The OIA Front Desk receives as many as 100 walk-in and 100 email queries per day (with considerable paperwork connected to these queries), so this would intensify what is already considered one of the heaviest work-study jobs on campus.

 

6) Suspension of International Travel Award program for OIA staff.

Three years ago the OIA initiated a travel award program for members of its staff who do not normally travel abroad for their work.   We held an annual competition in which staff proposed projects that would advance the work of the office while simultaneously enhancing their international expertise.  We have given 1-2 $3000 awards each year.  This program will be suspended indefinitely.

7) Salary cuts or non-replacement upon retirement of Senior Staff.

 

Three senior OIA staff are expected to retire within the next two years.  At least one of these positions will not be refilled, and there may well be salary reductions for the new occupants of the other position(s).  This will result in anywhere between $60,000-150,000 in base reductions.

 

8) Even greater use of IT to replace travel.

 

The OIA will step up its initiatives in using IT for partnership negotiations and advancement, for professional development opportunities, and for collaborative, interactive international teaching.

9) Continued automation of admissions and visa processing activities.

 

10) Continued outsourcing of time-consuming credentials analysis cases to private consultant, rather than spend costly staff time on them.

11) Support growth of study abroad through new fees.

It is standard operating procedure across the U.S. to fund the growth and management of study abroad growth at least partially through fees.  IUPUI had no such fees until 2008-09, when a Study Abroad Program Fee of $75 per student was instituted. Our first substantial income from this fee is expected during summer 2010 (perhaps $20,000). This will be used to cover some of the costs of managing, developing, and recruiting students for IUPUI’s growing number of study abroad programs.  

The OIA (and the faculty Study Abroad Committee) would prefer a different sort of study abroad fee, however, and will continue to advocate for this alternate form.  This alternate form (a $5-$10 international learning fee for all students each semester) is increasingly being adopted across the U.S.  If IUPUI were to adopt such a fee, the funds would be channeled into stipends for faculty to develop new programs, significant increases in study abroad scholarships, and – for the first time – an emergency fund to handle the crises that sometimes arise in study abroad programs.

12) Raising visa services fees to level of IU-Bloomington (a 30% increase).

13) Continued application for external grants for student/faculty mobility and curriculum development.

The OIA will continue to support faculty in applying for external funding for their international work (e.g., the Fulbright program) while applying for campus-wide grants itself.  This last year, we were awarded a Fulbright-Hayes Group Travel Award that enabled us to support 12 IUPUI faculty and IPS teachers in spending a month in intensive seminars and experiential learning with our strategic partner, Moi University in Eldoret, Kenya.

14) More aggressive campaign for international initiatives through the IU Foundation.

15) Collaboration with other units and community organizations to cost-share in advancing internationalization.

The OIA has been actively pursuing a number of avenues in this regard:

  • Split admissions positions with units interested in more school-specific processing (e.g., Kelley Direct position)
  • Negotiate office time-sharing, as we are now doing with School of Education
  • Continue to work closely with Multicultural Center, Student Life, Enrollment Services, Consortium on Learning, University College, Office of Research, Graduate School, Campus Housing, Student Scholarships, and schools – to develop jointly sponsored activities
  • Advocate for strong IUPUI presence in allocating university-wide international funds.
  • Advocate that all high-end scholarships (e.g., Bepko, Plater, etc.) include study abroad stipends
  • Seek Enrollment Shaping Initiative funds to support student recruitment efforts
  • Seek RISE funds to support development of study abroad

 

           

16) Reworking of the International Development Fund (IDF).

The IDF is administered by the Office for Research, in consultation with the OIA.  It was established some 10 years ago as a source of seed grants for a wide range of internationalization initiatives.  Its funding comes from 20% of the administrative indirects of all internationally-oriented grants at IUPUI.  Due to a variety of historical circumstances, the IDF has never been funded to the level it was supposed to be, and its grants have been focused only on research collaborations.  Through much discussion with the Vice Chancellor for Research as well as the faculty IDF Committee, we found ways to raise the funding total for IDF grants from $75,000 per year to $100,000 (still nowhere near the amount mentioned in its founding documents) and to add new categories of grants.  This development will compensate for some of the cuts in OIA funds for supporting new initiatives, and comes from a sustainable, renewable source, as long as faculty apply for external grants following their seed funding. 

As newly restructured, the IDF gives small seed grants for:

  • international research collaborations
  • international travel grants
  • creative use of IT for international work
  • curriculum internationalization

There is also an additional new internal grant category to support visiting international scholars.

 

17) Continued development of strategic international partnerships. 

With the unanimous support of the IUPUI administration, Deans Council, and the faculty International Council, the OIA has been guiding the campus in developing a small number of strategic partnerships as cost-effective and philosophically appropriate means of  internationalization. Such partnerships build platforms that enable multiple students, faculty, staff, and programs to become involved – at considerably less cost than each unit generating its own.  They also provide the dialogue and collaboration essential to 21st century internationalization.  Because they generate 2+2 and similar programs, such partnerships also contribute to the income generation described in the next item.

18) Working for increased campus-wide income from increased international student enrollment.

Increased non-resident international enrollments add to the general economic health of the campus, while furthering internationalization. Over the last 10 years, since the OIA added a campus-wide recruiter, the number of international students studying at IUPUI has more than doubled.  Currently 2/3 of the non-resident undergraduates at IUPUI are international students.  These students are also retained at significantly higher percentages than domestic students and have higher 5-year graduation rates. 

Phrased another way, compared to 10 years ago, IUPUI annually receives at least $12,000,000 more in tuition alone due to OIA recruitment, admissions, and support efforts.  This yields income for Schools and the Enrollment Shaping Fund (through tuition), and for the OIA (through application and visa services fees). 

For the last three years, the OIA has been engaged in an even more aggressive international student recruitment program that has yielded significant results.  We are targeting specific high yield countries and also supporting schools in recruiting activities.  We are working to make IUPUI ‘s web presence more effective for prospective international students.  We are aggressively seeking students who come with scholarships from their countries of origin.

We are also facilitating the developing of 2+2 programs between IUPUI schools and partner universities abroad.  There are currently two such programs in existence and 12 more under construction. In such programs, students spend two years at a partner university overseas and then two years at IUPUI, in a very focused curriculum that yields degrees from both.  These students are generally full-tuition paying students who bring substantial income to IUPUI.

 

Summation

 

The OIA is feeling the impact of the budget reductions already made.  The cuts in travel are significant for a unit whose work is international in scope.  The cuts in staffing are significant for a unit where student numbers and new programs are growing.   We can weather the cuts this year and are making plans for other cuts next year.  If there are further cuts, however, there will certainly be a reduction in the international services and leadership we provide.  Admissions and visa processing times will increase, and we will limit ourselves to the basic activities mandated by U.S. law and IU policy.  Expert support for study abroad will decline.  And the program of international partnerships, which garnered IUPUI the prestigious Heiskell Award in 2009, will suffer significantly.  IUPUI may well revert to its standing at the bottom of its peer institutions in terms of measures of internationalization. 

 


Columbus Campus


Dentistry

1) How are you dealing with the projected base budget reductions for 2009-10 and 2010-11?
  • How will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students and faculty? Will some planned initiatives related to teaching and learning, research and scholarship, and civic engagement have to be delayed or terminated?
  • If your unit experienced enrollment increases during the Summer II and/or fall terms, how have you used the additional revenue? 

Bullets 1 and 2:  We were able to establish the anticipated base budget reduction by not reallocating tuition increase dollars.  This was done at the cost of no salary increases to all employees.  We have a number of vacant FT Faculty positions, that are either being temporarily covered by PT assignments or are currently advertised if identified as a critical need.  We will continue to strategically manage our resources and priorities to focus on student and patient resource needs as we further advance our academic environment, that includes pre-clinical, clinical, and research infrastructure needs.

Bullet 3:  Our enrollment levels remain consistent and the majority of our FT students are assessed at a flat rate per semester, and not on a per credit hour basis.

2) To achieve the campus goal of doubling the numbers of undergraduate students completing baccalaureate degrees, and to increase the number graduating in four years, what changes have you implemented or planned to implement in course scheduling, curriculum, student support etc.?

Not applicable to the school of dentistry.

3) Do you currently have

  • school-based space and
  • centrally-scheduled space
  • to support an increase in credit hours without a significant investment?  Are you investigating methods to use space more effectively

    • on Fridays and weekends? 
    • with online/hybrid/distance education course offerings? 
    • by developing larger classrooms?

No, we do not have physical space to accommodate an increase in credit hours.  We currently use rooms in other campus buildings to help with our current course schedules.    We have introduced a dental assisting distance learning program that meets for classes on Saturdays during the semesters, but the standard programs, Dental Assisting, Dental Hygiene, Dental Hygiene Bachelor Program, Doctorate of Dental Surgery, and several graduate programs hold classes Monday through Friday.  We do have a continuing education program that uses the lecture halls and labs on weeknights and weekends periodically.

4) What are your priorities for student technology support, and what progress has been made as you have worked with UITS staff this year to implement your technology plans?

a.       S116 & S117 Audio visual upgrades (Completed):

New instructor stations;    Upgraded outdated components;   Increased number of available microphones per room

b.        New printers for the student computer lab (Completed):

2 duplexing printers (One for in the computer lab and one in the main library for when the computer lab is occupied for a class)

c.        Podcasting (In-process):

 Working on improvements, we currently utilize Snapkast and it does not provide chaptering.  We will be trying Profcast for Windows starting next semester to see if this meets the needs of both faculty and students.  UITS is currently running a pilot program for podcast and are just moving into Phase 2 of the program.  Their solution does not offer chaptering and still does not address the issue of back to back lectures such as what we have scheduled in our lecture halls.  They still have another Phase of the program that is slotted to begin in Fall of 2010.

d.       Upgrading of Wireless Access Points (Completed):

This upgrade was completed earlier in 2009.  Working in conjunction with UITS, they replaced all the outdated hardware. 

e.       SB05 renovation (in process)- This is installation of a state of the art preclinical simulation laboratory. The renovation project is just beginning and interaction with UITS to design the AV portion of the lab is critical.  This will bring all aspects of audio/visual components up to date. 

 

f.    Installation of hardware and software to enable the use of digital radiography in the clinics.


Diversity, Equity & Inclusion

1) How are you dealing with the projected base budget reductions for 2009-10 and 2010-11? For instance, how will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students, faculty, and staff? Will some planned initiatives have to be delayed or terminated?

Education

1) How are you dealing with the projected base budget reductions for 2009-10 and 2010-11?
  • How will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students and faculty? Will some planned initiatives related to teaching and learning, research and scholarship, and civic engagement have to be delayed or terminated?
  • If your unit experienced enrollment increases during the Summer II and/or fall terms, how have you used the additional revenue? 
The multiple budget cuts have been difficult for the School of Education. Our state appropriation has been reduced from $2,321,561 in 2007-2008 to $2,301,933 in ’08-’09. At the same time, our assessments have steadily gone up, from $2,932,976 in 2007-2008 to $3,094,676 in 2008-2009. At the same time, we have lost our undergraduate technology fees, our travel has been cut, and all salaries have been frozen. On top of this, the President’s bonus payment to undergraduates with a B or higher average, which includes most of our School of Education students, has added additional expenses.
In response, we are not filling vacant faculty and staff positions and are working to generate additional credit hours through the expansion of graduate, online, and summer courses, as well as expanding our Office of Professional Development income. Although we have secured funding for the Woodrow Wilson Teaching Fellows and the Urban Teacher Residency programs, the income from these grants goes primarily to students and the School of Education is responsible for a 1:1 match. In addition, we are working to increase external funding in order to secure additional indirect income.
 
We have increased our graduate and undergraduate tuition income as well as our student fees ($7,287,918 in ’07-’08 compared to $8,038,163 in ’08-’09). We are closing fiscal year ‘08-‘09 with a net operating income of $784,018 and a positive fund balance of $1,880,831. Because of the budgetary uncertainties and anticipated cutbacks in state appropriations, we have been very conservative in the use of additional income and fund balances.
 
a.      How will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students and faculty? Will some planned initiatives related to teaching and learning, research and scholarship, and civic engagement have to be delayed or terminated?
 
With approximately equal numbers of clinical faculty and tenured/tenure track faculty, we have set a high priority on increasing the number of tenure/tenure track faculty. The budget reductions will prevent us from achieving that goal and force us to continue relying on high numbers of clinical and adjunct faculty. In addition, our proposal for a doctoral program in urban education is moving through the approval process. Such programs are costly and we may need to delay the launch if we are not able to offer graduate assistantships and hire at least one senior faculty member to focus on this program. Furthermore, although we have continued to work toward equity, the salaries of Bloomington faculty are higher than those of our faculty at IUPUI. It is very difficult to be a core campus with RCM when there is a significant gap in salaries.
 
Programmatically, the expense of supporting our teacher education students in their field placements is high. These coaching costs may need to be reduced, which has implications for the quality of support we provide our students and the field sites. In addition, we have undertaken a reform effort of our undergraduate elementary education program that will anchor faculty in partner schools. This will add costs in the form of faculty time and will be monitored closely to determine cost-benefit.
 
We have not yet replaced our Development Officer, which has negatively impacted our philanthropic support, including student scholarships. The fund-raising goals for the upcoming IUPUI campaign, therefore, may have to be lowered.
 
Our travel funds are low as well and have impeded our ability to support the development of international exchanges.
 
b.      If your unit experienced enrollment increases during the Summer II and/or fall terms, how have you used the additional revenue? 
 
Undergraduate enrollments went down in 2008-2009, so we have budgeted conservatively for lower enrollments in ’09-’10. Given our conservative budgeting and tuition rate increase we did see an increase in tuition over budget. We plan to use this to fund our $300 bonus payments to undergraduates with a B or better grade average.

2) To achieve the campus goal of doubling the numbers of undergraduate students completing baccalaureate degrees, and to increase the number graduating in four years, what changes have you implemented or planned to implement in course scheduling, curriculum, student support etc.?

Most of the students who enter the School of Education as juniors complete the undergraduate teacher education program. With the help of University College, we follow up each semester with students who have not yet registered. We are funding a joint Advisor position between the School of Education and University College in order to move students successfully from their freshman and sophomore years to entry into the School of Education. We are working to increase the number of direct admit students so that our advisors can meet with them early and assure they take required pre-requisite coursework.

3) Do you currently have

  • school-based space and
  • centrally-scheduled space
  • to support an increase in credit hours without a significant investment?  Are you investigating methods to use space more effectively

    • on Fridays and weekends? 
    • with online/hybrid/distance education course offerings? 
    • by developing larger classrooms?

We have priority classrooms assigned to the School of Education. These include ES 1114, 1116, 1117, 1122, 1126, 2102, and 2106. We also have priority in ES 1128 for music classes only (otherwise it is a priority room for HPER), and ES 2127 for counseling classes (otherwise it is priority for Social Work).
a.      on Fridays and weekends? 
 
·         We can support an increase in credit hours in terms of higher enrollments if we wanted to increase class sizes. We can also use space more effectively by better utilizing Friday and weekend time periods. Currently we offer E201 on Fridays and G598 on Saturdays, but we can do more. We can also offer more classes during the 4:30-5:45 time period.
 
b.      with online/hybrid/distance education course offerings?
 
·         We are offering more online / hybrid courses, but not enough.  We need to develop the undergraduate program courses.  Regarding distance ed classes, we are offering more distance education classes (grad level only), but those spaces are at capacity as well.
 
c.       by developing larger classrooms?
·         In terms of larger classrooms, no.  We don’t have any control over this.
We are completely out of space for faculty offices in the School of Education and we have multiple needs for renovating our existing space on the 3rd floor of our building. We will be taking over some space from our technology area to build several additional offices, and will be applying for grant funds to build space for graduate students in our Commons area. The space where the Urban Center for the Advancement of STEM Education (UCASE) was built took away two classrooms on the first floor of the Education building. Both UCASE and the Center on Urban and Multicultural Education (CUME) need to expand into more space. We took away one of our technology rooms on the second floor for CUME.

4) What are your priorities for student technology support, and what progress has been made as you have worked with UITS staff this year to implement your technology plans?

We are unhappy that our undergraduate student technology fees were pulled. We were very satisfied with our technology consortium agreement with Social Work, SLIS, PE/Tourism, and Education. The funding helped to support two technology staff members, and funding for their positions is being eliminated after the next two years.   In addition, the technology fees were used to support the acquisition of cutting edge technology for our education students, and to prepare them to use the technology as teachers. This funding is no longer available from UITS. Finally, the computer labs on the second floor of the Education-Social Work building belong to the SOE inventory. We may need to take back 1-2 of these spaces in the not-too-distant future as our need for offices and meeting space grows, so our agreement with UITS must allow this.
 
Our priorities for student technology support are:
·         Purchase a sufficient supply of technology equipment (including, but not limited to interactive Whiteboards and Slates, iPods, digital video cameras) for our faculty to use with education students to ensure they know how to use technology to enhance instruction.
·         Improve our distance education capacity in the School of Education. Our current space is cramped and outdated.
·         Ensure students electrical outlets throughout the Education building, including outlets on the first floor where we have set up work spaces. (No outlets are available in a section of the main hallway.)
·         Increase our online course offerings and support to both students and faculty. UITS can play a large role in preparing students and supporting them as they take online courses. They could increase their support for online students, or students new to online learning.
·         A state of the art, interactive room for both distance education as well as a place for our faculty to experiment with new technologies and host interactive demonstrations.

Engineering & Technology

1) How are you dealing with the projected base budget reductions for 2009-10 and 2010-11?
  • How will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students and faculty? Will some planned initiatives related to teaching and learning, research and scholarship, and civic engagement have to be delayed or terminated?
  • If your unit experienced enrollment increases during the Summer II and/or fall terms, how have you used the additional revenue? 

The school base budget for 2009-10 expanded due to three factors; tuition increase, enrollment increase, and introduction of a new program fee for all majosr in the school as a result of consolidating the non-tuition fees. Therefore, the base budget reduction of $396K for 2009-10 as projected by the IUPUI Budget Office will be absorbed within the new increased base budget. The amount of base reduction for 2010-11 for the school is not known yet and it is not clear if the available excess base will be sufficient to cover the reduction.

The projected base reductions will affect all of the school activities in teaching, research, and engagement areas. The plans to hire additional faculty members for the new Motorsports Engineering program and pending Energy Enginering program are now on hold. The plans of returning some of the indirect cost recovery funds from the grants and contracts to PI's and departments to energize additional research will also be delayed. School will continue depending on more part-time faculty teaching.

School experienced increased enrollment during Summer II and fall terms. Additional revenues were directed to increasing new student scholarship matches, paying additional part-time faculty members, and renovation of research laboratories.

2) To achieve the campus goal of doubling the numbers of undergraduate students completing baccalaureate degrees, and to increase the number graduating in four years, what changes have you implemented or planned to implement in course scheduling, curriculum, student support etc.?

The school efforts to increase the numbers of BS degrees have been limited to overall retention efforts. The school average for retaining students going from freshmen to sophomore has been around 75% and from junior to senior has been around 84%. By improving these numbers, school hopes to increase both the four year and six year graduation rates.

School had initiated 5-year BS/MS options in electrical, computer, and mechanical engineering few years ago for academically well prepared students. It appears that the number of students choosing these options are on the rise especially for the students who receive prestigious campus scholarships such as Bepko, Presidential, and Plater scholarships.

3) Do you currently have

  • school-based space and
  • centrally-scheduled space
  • to support an increase in credit hours without a significant investment?  Are you investigating methods to use space more effectively

    • on Fridays and weekends? 
    • with online/hybrid/distance education course offerings? 
    • by developing larger classrooms?

School does not have space to support an increase in credit hours and it relies on the campus teaching space both on the main campus and on satelliet teaching facilities in the north and south of Indianapolis.

School implemented the following steps to increase the student credit hours: 

·        Department of Design and Communication Technology introduced 4-week courses.

·        Organizational Leadership and Supervision Program offers late-start (12- and 8-week) courses.

·         Computer and Information technology Program offers late-start (12- and 8-week) courses.

·         Schoole leverages OnCourse to provide more hybrid course offerings, thereby using on-campus space for more engaging student learning and using OnCourse to disseminate content in asynchronous ways

·         Technology courses are being offered at Park 100 and scheduled for Greenwood

·         School offers several components of the M.S. in Technology on the weekend; plans are underway to offer the entire M.S. in Technology via OnCourse and weekend options.

·         To serve veterans, school will apply for an NSF grant related to innovations in education, curriculum, and infrastructure to be able to redesign some courses to accommodate unique veteran needs.

·         To serve adult learners, school is leveraging existing Organizational and Leadership degrees and certificates to be offered in accelerated formats at Greenwood and Park 100.  The initiative being developed is Adult Programs in Leadership for Undergraduate Students (A-PLUS) and is designed to be a competitive response to other market entrants (e.g. University of Phoenix and Indiana Wesleyan University).

4) What are your priorities for student technology support, and what progress has been made as you have worked with UITS staff this year to implement your technology plans?

As a result of the reallocation of the undergraduate student technology fees from schools to UITS, the school had worked with UITS administrators to put together a transition plan. The draft memorandum of understanding is now in its final stages. Based on this, six school based computing laboratories will be turned over to UITS for a period of three years for UITS to provide the equipment upgrade, computing service and maintenance for the use of these laboratories. The agreement will be in effect starting July 1, 2010. 


External Affairs

1) How are you dealing with the projected base budget reductions for 2009-10 and 2010-11? For instance, how will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students, faculty, and staff? Will some planned initiatives have to be delayed or terminated?

External Affairs provides marketing and communication services to the campus including media relations, public and community relations, alumni and government relations, communications and marketing including website design and development. To minimize the impact on the day-to-day operations of the campus, it is our intention to reduce our advertising campaign expenditures. As advertising expenditures reduce, external affairs staff must shift attention to earned media, social media, public and alumni relations to continue reaching a key audiences.

A reduction in the advertising budget will permit us to continue the fall flight of advertising (2010) and eliminate or drastically reduce the spring advertising media buy (2010 and 2011). The current phase of the advertising campaign is designed to reach CEOs and influencers through multi-media channels. Influencers include adults over 40 who influence students to enroll and/or influence higher education policy decisions. To reach this target audience, we utilize newspaper, television, radio, billboards, newspaper boxes, mall signage, and public transportation. Not only is this audience critical in attracting graduate students as well as high ability undergraduates, this target audience is essential to lay the foundation upon which our next comprehensive fundraising campaign will be successful at IUPUI.

In addition to the reduction of local media buys, a reduction in the advertising budget will also affect our national media campaign targeted toward alumni and peer institutions. We will reduce the number of direct mail and electronic pieces for the national reputation campaign and recycle existing public relations and media content. Our success in the peer institution campaign has led to improvements in our national rankings and visibility. If additional budget cuts are required, our next line of defense is to reduce the hours available for our hourly employees. Because our organization is dependent on hourly student workers - particularly in the generation of new media content for the web, we run the risk of delaying service or reducing services to the academic units.

 


Finance & Administration, Vice Chancellor

1) How are you dealing with the projected base budget reductions for 2009-10 and 2010-11? For instance, how will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students, faculty, and staff? Will some planned initiatives have to be delayed or terminated?

Finance and Administration units experienced varied degrees of decreased service delivery.  The one unit within the division not affected by the FY 2009-10 reductions is the Police. This unit was established early on as a priority and held harmless. This resulted in greater reductions in other units.  

 

In units such as the Office of Finance the impact of the reductions taken are offset, in some cases, by the automation of former manual processes. These process changes were already in development prior to the reductions and helped soften the effect on customer service. Along the same line we made the decision to not print human resource policy manuals and to rely on the web instead. We now provide less IUPUI branded products at the employment fairs. Both are reasonable ways to change the delivery of service without significant negative impact.

In Environmental Health and Safety service delivery was protected during budget reductions by the unit’s current ability to generate revenue. However, it has created a more precarious financial environment because the ability to maintain the same level of service is now more reliant on contracts that are competitively bid.

 

We have made tougher decisions to discontinue long time services in both the Human Resources and Campus Facilities Services (CFS) units. CFS has experienced the most visible reduction in services:

  • Reduced cleaning of office areas (no change to public spaces such hallways, stairwells, classrooms, and restrooms)
  • Elimination of C-fold towels in laboratories
  • Reduced number of trash removals per week in offices
  • Reduced number of flowers planted on campus
  • Reduced amount of mulch used on campus
  • Reduced sidewalk and road maintenance
  • Reduced turf maintenance work – less irrigation
  • Reduced turf maintenance work – less fertilization

 

Additional cuts have occurred within Campus Facility Services, but do not directly affect service provided to the campus.  For example, certain administrative tasks and costs have been shifted and/or minimized where possible to provide more resources for direct service delivery. In addition, internal budgets for items such as durable equipment, uniforms and tools have been reduced as well in order to minimize the impact on services provided to the campus. 

 

Reductions experienced in the Vice Chancellor’s office, while no direct impact on service,  has eliminated the ability to increase the police force ranks without seeking campus level support which may be felt in increased campus assessments. This action that was avoided in fiscal year 2009-10 when we  added two police officers.

Overall, I believe Finance and Administration has experienced the FY 2010 budget reductions while protecting service delivery as much as possible.  It has left us with managers supervising larger areas; less depth in staff to respond to illness, vacations, or vacancies; and a human toll has been taken. There is a growing concern for job security and work overload.  The majority of our units have expressed that stress and anxiety are increasing both within units and in interactions across campus.  Fear of further reductions in staffing seems widespread and seems to contribute to the environment of stress and anxiety.  

Our divisional vision statement reads as follows: “We aspire to be the very best at what we do. Every employee will be engaged, inspired, and prepared to deliver service with distinction.”

 

Our staff takes pride in what they do and want to do exceptional work. This vision statement becomes more aspirational with each budget reduction.

To prepare for future reductions we are asking ourselves to think boldly and differently. We are accumulating suggestions from all units to eliminate steps and functions that appear not to add value. We are looking at opportunities to generate revenue from outside of the IUPUI campus, for example providing services similar as jag tag to IVY Tech campuses.  We are looking for opportunities to leverage positions by sharing IT services between units.


Health and Rehabilitation Sciences

1) How are you dealing with the projected base budget reductions for 2009-10 and 2010-11?
  • How will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students and faculty? Will some planned initiatives related to teaching and learning, research and scholarship, and civic engagement have to be delayed or terminated?
  • If your unit experienced enrollment increases during the Summer II and/or fall terms, how have you used the additional revenue? 

1.             How are you dealing with the projected base budget reductions for 2009-10 and 2010-11?

 

RESPONSE:  The School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences dealt with the projected base budget reductions for 2009-10 and 2010-11 by reducing travel budget by 50% and the salary line for vacated staff positions by 50%.   We have had to use cash reserves to fill critical staff positions.   In spite of the reduction in travel budget, the School has continued to support faculty to participate in professional development activities by using cash reserves, grants, and indirect cost recovery funds.

 

a.       How will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students and faculty? Will some planned initiatives related to teaching and learning, research and scholarship, and civic engagement have to be delayed or terminated?

 

RESPONSE:  At this point, we do not anticipate that the projected base reductions will significantly affect our ability to deliver services to students and faculty.    As a result of the budget reductions, the staff support for the clinical placement of occupational therapy students was reduced from a full-time position to a part-time hourly position.  The impact of this decision is that the Academic Fieldwork Coordinator is devoting more of her time to clerical duties.  The School intends to use cash reserves to support ongoing teaching, research, and service activities.   The timeline for the addition of faculty and staff support for the proposed B.S in Health Sciences degree will be reviewed.

 

b.      If your unit experienced enrollment increases during the Summer II and/or fall terms, how have you used the additional revenue? 

             

RESPONSE:   None of the programs housed in the School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences experienced enrollment increase during Summer II and/or fall terms. The majority of the programs (i.e., Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, and Nutrition and Dietetic Internship program) offered by the school have capped enrollments and are fully subscribed. 

2) To achieve the campus goal of doubling the numbers of undergraduate students completing baccalaureate degrees, and to increase the number graduating in four years, what changes have you implemented or planned to implement in course scheduling, curriculum, student support etc.?

 

RESPONSE:  The School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences does not offer baccalaureate degrees. 

3) Do you currently have

  • school-based space and
  • centrally-scheduled space
  • to support an increase in credit hours without a significant investment?  Are you investigating methods to use space more effectively

    • on Fridays and weekends? 
    • with online/hybrid/distance education course offerings? 
    • by developing larger classrooms?

 

RESPONSE:  The School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences does not have sufficient school-based labs and research spaces to meet the instructional and learning needs of students.  There is no centrally-scheduled space in Coleman Hall.  We have to schedule classes outside of our dedicated classroom space and many times the space allocated is not optimal. We are using the only conference room in the School for classes and renting space from the School of Medicine.  Our large classrooms are at capacity. To maximize the use of existing space and increase student access to courses, some graduate and undergraduate courses are offered online and classes offered on Fridays and weekends.   The distance education certificate program in Leadership Development in Pediatric Nutrition meets all day one Saturday/month. 

4) What are your priorities for student technology support, and what progress has been made as you have worked with UITS staff this year to implement your technology plans?

RESPONSE:   As a graduate  school, the School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences is  responsible for developing and implementing plans to acquire, upgrade, and maintain its technology and to provide student technology support.  Our priority is to make sure that students and faculty have access to up-to-date instructional technology.   We have a contract with the School of Medicine to provide computer and related support for faculty and staff. 

 We have an ongoing working relationship with UITS to access the Oncourse platform.  Recently, the School consulted with UITS in making plans for upgrading the technology in CF 205 to accommodate Adobe Connect.


Herron School of Art

1) How are you dealing with the projected base budget reductions for 2009-10 and 2010-11?
  • How will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students and faculty? Will some planned initiatives related to teaching and learning, research and scholarship, and civic engagement have to be delayed or terminated?
  • If your unit experienced enrollment increases during the Summer II and/or fall terms, how have you used the additional revenue? 

1.    a.)    How are you dealing with the projected base budget reductions for 2009-10 and 2010-11?

Herron continues to move forward through the economic downturn and cuts to higher education.  We did not replace one full-time technical position in the Ceramics program area and we moved one full-time computer technology support line to external affairs.  We delayed hiring an Assistant Dean for Development and External Affairs for 18 months. We are also restructuring the Office of Development and External Affairs in the early part of 2010. These changes will reduce the staff number by one and make better use of Herron’s graduate fellows.  Our savings in these areas will make it possible to continue our current level of support to students.  We anticipate advertising for the Assistant Dean for Development and External Affairs in January 2010 and the Ceramic Technician at the end of FY 2009-10 for employment in 2010-2011 academic year.

b.)    How will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students and faculty? 

Without staff support, students and faculty do not get the level of service they require to be as successful as they can be.  We continue to suffer in this area, especially with student counseling efforts and career placement.  With the addition of graduate programs and the counseling and recruitment required in this area, we continue to place more demand on our student services area.  We will increase support with an additional Associate Dean to direct the graduate programs and oversee curriculum and fellowship/teaching assignments beginning Fall 2010.  Currently we have only one Associate Dean who oversees student and academic affairs including international travel programs, graduate programs, and other academic initiatives.  The additional Associate Dean will help to even the work load and provide more assistance for the Office of Student Services.

Will some planned initiatives related to teaching and learning, research and scholarship, and civic engagement have to be delayed or terminated?  Although we are experiencing some setbacks, Herron continues to stay on task for planned initiatives related to these areas.

Herron has experienced growth in student numbers over the last ten years.  We were at capacity in our buildings on 16th and Pennsylvania streets at 814 students.  With our move to Indiana Avenue for Sculpture and Ceramic programs in 2000, and our move to main campus to Eskenazi Hall in 2005, our square footage growth allowed our numbers to climb in all areas.  Herron is currently at 945 students and still experiencing growth.  Add to this the addition of four MFA programs since Fall 2006 and another MFA program approved for Fall 2011 and we are at full capacity on Indiana Avenue in the Sculpture and Ceramic facility and reaching capacity at Eskenazi Hall.   Our expansion to the Sculpture and Ceramic facility will add an additional 15,000 square feet for undergraduate and graduate programming.  With this addition we will seek approval for an additional MFA program in Ceramics as well as a glass program.  This addition will significantly impact both undergraduate and graduate programming in these two disciplines. The $3.2 million expansion to the Sculpture and Ceramics Building is supported solely through private funding.

Research and scholarship efforts continue to increase however the support for art and design nationally is very small in comparison to health, science and the humanities.  Although we continue to write proposals for Herron holistically, the faculty do not have some of the basic research support that other schools and universities offer, such as studio space supplied by IUPUI, start up packages and significant travel funding for research.  This significantly impacts their research and presents an additional hardship along with relatively low salaries. Most fine art faculty secure studio space outside of Herron as an out-of-pocket expense.  The time and effort expended is limited due to the inconvenience of off-site studio space and the burden of rent with no faculty salary increases.

The arts funding in Indianapolis has been negatively affected by the state revenue shortfalls and diminished foundations.  Herron’s gallery exhibitions and lecture series are funded primarily by arts funding from local arts funding agencies, foundations and private giving.  These are crucial programs that support the educational mission of the school, while connecting Herron to the larger community. This year is the first in twelve years Herron has not received program funding for our gallery exhibitions from the Indianapolis Arts Council and the Regional Art Partnerships.  Given that there are so many other areas that need support, this places an additional burden on Herron to seek new funding sources for the galleries and visiting artist lectures.

Civic engagement for Herron is growing with the addition of a high energy and dedicated staff member to the Basile Center for Art, Design and Public Life.  Projects are currently being developed and executed by students for numerous campus and community collaborations.  A few of the more prominent projects are highlighted below.

c.)    If your unit experienced enrollment increases during the Summer II and/or Fall terms, how have you used the additional revenue? 

Our predictions for growth were off significantly for FY 2009-2010.  However, we did show an increase in enrollments over last academic year for both Summer II and Fall 2009.  Summer II growth was up by 132 credit hours creating $40K additional revenue and Fall growth was up by 248 credit hours creating $354K additional revenue.  Of the additional revenue in Summer II and Fall $53K was pulled back by campus initiatives (ESI and SFR).  Herron’s state appropriations were decreased FY2010 by $79K and tax assessments were increased by $279K from FY 2009.  Given this comprehensive look at budget increases and decreases our enrollment increase will not be considered “additional revenue” for Herron.
 

2) To achieve the campus goal of doubling the numbers of undergraduate students completing baccalaureate degrees, and to increase the number graduating in four years, what changes have you implemented or planned to implement in course scheduling, curriculum, student support etc.?

We have 4-year curriculum plans for all students.  Our Academic Advising Reports are all coded and available to students for planning. Fall and spring courses are marked on the reports so students have plenty of time to plan accordingly.  Our full-time students have increased significantly since we moved to Eskenazi Hall and the number of part-time students has been declining.


We are now offering many more summer courses including:
a.     Senior capstone class (HER-J 410)
b.    Required courses (HER-J 400, HER-H 101, HER-H 102, HER-H 103)
c.    Many gateway major classes to allow students to catch up in painting, ceramics, art history, printmaking, furniture design
d.    Addition of many studio elective classes required of most BFA candidates

The Academic Affairs committee is currently studying the degree requirements to determine if Herron can reduce the required credit hours by 3-6 credits for some degrees. In addition they are evaluating some courses to determine if the number of credits are appropriately assigned. These expected changes should help improve Herron’s four-year graduation rate.


Herron foundation program one-credit courses, X101 and X102, are stressing the expectation of a 4-year graduation.  Herron sends early warning letters to students who are struggling with attendance to encourage checking in with a faculty member or our student advisor.  The Foundation program has implemented a “block” structure for some courses and is currently considering other opportunities to provide block scheduling. This helps students complete the degree requirements in a more progressive way.


Visual Communication Design program implemented a block schedule change in 2000.  This past semester we had to add a new block of 25 students due to increased enrollment.


As stated in Question #1, Herron plans to add an additional Associate Dean to the mix in student services in Fall 2010.  This position will serve the students by ensuring that faculty continue to evaluate curriculum and credit hours, monitoring student retention and graduation rates and by making sure the policies for student advising are implemented.
 

3) Do you currently have

  • school-based space and
  • centrally-scheduled space
  • to support an increase in credit hours without a significant investment?  Are you investigating methods to use space more effectively

    • on Fridays and weekends? 
    • with online/hybrid/distance education course offerings? 
    • by developing larger classrooms?


Herron is taking advantage of the space that we have by offering more summer courses and elective courses on Fridays and over the weekends.  We have utilized the 230-seat auditorium by increasing our student numbers for art history classes, which can be taken by any IUPUI student fulfilling a humanities requirement for their individual program.  Herron currently has courses in art history and elective computer courses being offered on-line with several courses being considered for future on-line offerings.  Our limitations are studio art courses with enrollment numbers of 20 or less.  This is a requirement to meet NASAD accreditation.  


Community learning courses include evening and weekend offerings that in the past have increased income to the school.  However, with the current economy the shift is changing and the program is now a break-even venture each year or it has lost money since we moved to main campus.  Our Youth Art Camp (ages 5-16) and Honors Art Camp (offered to Jr and Sr high school students interested in attending an art college) are consistently full and offered only during the summer months.  We are researching other ideas on summer art programming to increase revenue.
 

4) What are your priorities for student technology support, and what progress has been made as you have worked with UITS staff this year to implement your technology plans?

We have submitted a plan to UITS that includes our 5-year technology plans that were written when the technology funds were in a Herron account.  To that end, we have worked with UITS to initiate the transition of three computer classrooms.  One technology center that was used as a lab and open to all IUPUI students that was monitored by UITS was taken over immediately.  Another computer classroom transition is underway with a turnover date to UITS scheduled for Fall 2010.  The move to leverage funds from schools to UITS has not been beneficial to the art and design school. The original agreement included large art-based equipment that fit within the art/design field and wasn’t always connected to technological advances per se.  The turnover in this income to UITS has in fact hampered our ability to provide this equipment to students.

UITS has provided (1) the Herron open lab (HR185) with a large format scanner, (2) the continuation of the license agreement with Adobe (as well as other applications-MS office, etc.) which will be beneficial to a large percentage of Herron students, and (3) UITS is continuing the wireless access in all areas of our building which is a plus for students and visiting artists.  Printing availability is also a plus for students across campus.
 


Informatics/Media Arts and Science

1) How are you dealing with the projected base budget reductions for 2009-10 and 2010-11?
  • How will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students and faculty? Will some planned initiatives related to teaching and learning, research and scholarship, and civic engagement have to be delayed or terminated?
  • If your unit experienced enrollment increases during the Summer II and/or fall terms, how have you used the additional revenue? 

2) To achieve the campus goal of doubling the numbers of undergraduate students completing baccalaureate degrees, and to increase the number graduating in four years, what changes have you implemented or planned to implement in course scheduling, curriculum, student support etc.?

3) Do you currently have

  • school-based space and
  • centrally-scheduled space
  • to support an increase in credit hours without a significant investment?  Are you investigating methods to use space more effectively

    • on Fridays and weekends? 
    • with online/hybrid/distance education course offerings? 
    • by developing larger classrooms?

4) What are your priorities for student technology support, and what progress has been made as you have worked with UITS staff this year to implement your technology plans?


Journalism

1) How are you dealing with the projected base budget reductions for 2009-10 and 2010-11?
  • How will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students and faculty? Will some planned initiatives related to teaching and learning, research and scholarship, and civic engagement have to be delayed or terminated?
  • If your unit experienced enrollment increases during the Summer II and/or fall terms, how have you used the additional revenue? 

Journalism has been at the top or near the top of schools in percent increase in credit hours and headcount for the last six semesters. Yet we are no better off financially. Why? Increased taxes and budget reductions have substantially reduced our flexibility.
 
Our faculty and staff are committed to provide the best possible curriculum and resources to our students that we can under the constraints we are under. We are pushing equipment costs to our students.
 
As far as civic engagement is concerned, we will not engage in any activity that costs money. Time we give willing and we are actively seeking grants to extend programs into our community.
 
As far as the increased revenue from summer and fall students is concerned, 100 percent was captured to satisfy the budget reduction require by the state’s loss of revenue.
 
Assuming no further budget reduction, we should be able to meet our 2011 budget.

2) To achieve the campus goal of doubling the numbers of undergraduate students completing baccalaureate degrees, and to increase the number graduating in four years, what changes have you implemented or planned to implement in course scheduling, curriculum, student support etc.?

Our growth indicates that we are doubling the number of undergraduate students completing baccalaureate degrees. We already offer sufficient courses and a schedule that students may graduate in four years if they are inclined to do so. Many students delay graduation due to semester long internships. Others take reduced loads to maintain a high GPA because they have aspirations for entering a graduate program. In short, there is no barrier to graduation in four years.

3) Do you currently have

  • school-based space and
  • centrally-scheduled space
  • to support an increase in credit hours without a significant investment?  Are you investigating methods to use space more effectively

    • on Fridays and weekends? 
    • with online/hybrid/distance education course offerings? 
    • by developing larger classrooms?

The only school-based spaces we have are two labs. Students use the labs when they are not used for instruction and when the building is open, including Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Currently all of our course sections can be handled with scheduling in the IT building.

For the last two semesters we have offered some courses on both the Bloomington and IUPUI campuses using video conferencing technology. The structural barriers that IU allows to exist make such school-based efficiencies very difficult. The two core campuses of Indiana University do not have the same campus calendars, do not honor the same holidays and do not begin and end classes on a common schedule. 

We are developing a fully online version of our M.A. in Public Relations.

4) What are your priorities for student technology support, and what progress has been made as you have worked with UITS staff this year to implement your technology plans?

The UITS capturing of the technology fees was done without a plan to use the money. There was no discussion with the deans before this maneuver was a firm decision. This action was a serious erosion of the principles of Responsibility Center Management.
 
After the capture of student technology fees, UITS called for proposals for its use. For several years, Associate Dean Brown encouraged UITS to implement a mass storage system for storage and retrieval of rich media. He wrote a proposal for such a system that would use student technology fees and attended regular meetings on the matter. It looked like a system would be in place by this semester. Apparently that proposal is stalled or abandoned. This system would have benefitted journalism but also any program or administrative unit that needs to store and retrieve video, still photos, graphics, music files, etc. Journalism did its best to encourage a mass storage system that would benefit the university.
 
We anticipate handling our own technology needs in the future but are open to discussions with UITS if they have future plans that would benefit our students.

Kelley School of Business

1) How are you dealing with the projected base budget reductions for 2009-10 and 2010-11?
  • How will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students and faculty? Will some planned initiatives related to teaching and learning, research and scholarship, and civic engagement have to be delayed or terminated?
  • If your unit experienced enrollment increases during the Summer II and/or fall terms, how have you used the additional revenue? 
A) How will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students and faculty? Will some planned initiatives related to teaching and learning, research and scholarship, and civic engagement have to be delayed or terminated?
 
We are trying hard to ensure that any cuts we are facing do not affect the quality of services to the students.  We continue to look at more efficient ways to provide the services to them. We have asked faculty to look more closely to their planned travel and to make sure they are aware of the travel restrictions. Overall we continue to carefully scrutinize all of our expenditures and try to make wise decisions in the allocation of our resources. 
 
Our accrediting agency (the AACSB) requires that a certain percentage of courses be taught by “academically qualified” research faculty. To meet previously tight budgets, our school runs near the minimum percentage of faculty who are tenured track (thus, typically, academically qualified). A significant goal in the next several years is to hire more academically qualified faculty in order to ensure that we stay sufficiently above the AACSB requirements.
 
We cannot reduce our current faculty costs any further without risking re-accreditation. It is critical to develop the resources to hire additional research active faculty to enhance our research, the quality of curriculum, and to meet accreditation standards.   Fewer resources to hire additional key faculty means that we will need to reduce course offerings and/or curriculum programming.
 
Attracting and retaining the best research active faculty requires that resources be made available to purchase research databases and to encourage faculty to attend conferences to present their work. These presentations are also important in enhancing the reputation of the school and in recruiting additional faculty. To the extent that reduced budgets affect the ability to provide these resources our ability to attract and retain and top-quality faculty will be harmed.
 
If we face any significant further budget cuts we may have to reduce our efforts in the areas of teaching and learning, research and scholarship, as well as civic engagement.
 
B) If your unit experienced enrollment increases during the Summer II and/or fall terms, how have you used the additional revenue?
The income generated from tuition in summer II was down by about $145,000. The fall enrollment was up by about $185,000. Thus the income for these two terms was a net gain of $40,000. There are no plans to spend it at this time. We plan to keep it in reserve in the event that the income generated in spring and summer I come in below budget.
 
If we net any additional revenue it will be used to offer additional sections of classes, improve classrooms, hire additional faculty, and provide resources to recruit additional students for the future growth of the school.

2) To achieve the campus goal of doubling the numbers of undergraduate students completing baccalaureate degrees, and to increase the number graduating in four years, what changes have you implemented or planned to implement in course scheduling, curriculum, student support etc.?

We offer a wide variety of courses in the summer to help students meet the 4-year graduation goal. Our advisors work with the students to plan their schedule to take courses in the summer. This has placed strains on our faculty in trying to offer a sufficient number of courses to meet student demand. Our greatest constraint is having enough academically qualified faculty to offer the number of courses demanded by students in the summer.
 
We have initiated a learning community specifically for students directed admitted to the school during their freshman year and we continue to improve that course based on faculty and student feedback.  Improvements planned for 2010 include involving additional faculty, more guest speakers from specific fields/industries in which students have expressed interest, and more integration of the assigned readings with the course activities.
 
The schedule of classes is created in cooperation with the advising staff and the faculty in the departments to minimize or eliminate course conflicts, and to ensure that students can graduate within 2 or 3 semester of taking I-core.  We also offer a complete array of the required business courses (100- through 400-level) throughout the summer semesters.
 
We have identified a staff member to serve as our Transfer Credit Coordinator.  This person meets with all prospective and actual transfer students to talk about how courses transfer to IUPUI, how they will be used to meek Kelley requirements, how to continue to select electives in the most efficient manner while still at IVTC, and pre-planning to complete the degree at IUPUI.  This person serves approximately 350 prospective and actual transfer students each year.
 
We have created stronger connections between our placement office staff and student organizations.  This allows students to choose their major more quickly and with better information. This, in turn, means that they are less likely to change their majors and delay their graduation.

3) Do you currently have

  • school-based space and
  • centrally-scheduled space
  • to support an increase in credit hours without a significant investment?  Are you investigating methods to use space more effectively

    • on Fridays and weekends? 
    • with online/hybrid/distance education course offerings? 
    • by developing larger classrooms?

  • school-based space and
The only “school-based” spaces available to the Kelly School are the “learning spaces” between the classrooms on the second floor. We developed these spaces with substantial private donations from friends of the school. While this has been a significant improvement, it does not provide enough space to significantly increase student interaction and expand a sense of student community. We would like to have additional space to provide students a place to study and enhance a connection with the Kelley School and each other.
 
  • centrally-scheduled space
None.
 
to support an increase in credit hours without a significant investment? Are you investigating methods to use space more effectively
a.       on Fridays and weekends? 
We have increased the number of courses that are required of all business students on Fridays and Saturdays. We also began offering several courses for business minors on Fridays. The courses have been well received and we anticipate continuing to increase Friday and Saturday offerings as rapidly as the market permits.   
 
b.      with online/hybrid/distance education course offerings?
We are exploring the possibility of offering some of our undergraduate business classes in a hybrid format. This will increase the utilization of classroom space and offer students the opportunity to select a variety of course offerings. We currently offer online courses as part of our certificate program, but few online courses are allowed in the major. We have decided to work first with hybrid course offerings.
 
c.       by developing larger classrooms?
We are seriously space constrained. Our ability to support any significant growth in programs is limited by this lack of space. We recently renovated BS 2000 to increase capacity and technology in the classroom. We do not have any additional space where we could create larger classrooms in our building. We do offer large classes in other buildings but find it difficult to schedule those.

4) What are your priorities for student technology support, and what progress has been made as you have worked with UITS staff this year to implement your technology plans?

The transfer of the student technology fee to UITS costs the Kelley School approximately $250,000 per year. In return UITS has agreed to manage a computer lab (which we paid roughly $50,000 to do on our own), and have provided approximately 1000 of our students with a credit of about $26 each for printing on campus. Since our student technology fees were re-allocated to UITS, we have not had any further contact of any significance with UITS. 
 
We do have access to a part time UITS staff person to serve as a resource for KSB and to expedite the resolution of problems with OnCourse. UITS has also assisted us to educate our faculty on distance learning technologies and their application in the event of a business continuity crisis. However, our own staff made videos of the session we put together to educate our faculty on distance learning technology – its strengths and limitations.
 
A critical priority is to get a stable system for course management system. We believe we have achieved this with the use of ANGEL in our Kelley Direct MBA program and with the use of our own staff. Unfortunately we continue to experience serious problems with OnCourse. The continuing lack of reliability in crucial times for OnCourse is a major problem that we would like to see resolved as soon as possible.

Law

1) How are you dealing with the projected base budget reductions for 2009-10 and 2010-11?
  • How will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students and faculty? Will some planned initiatives related to teaching and learning, research and scholarship, and civic engagement have to be delayed or terminated?
  • If your unit experienced enrollment increases during the Summer II and/or fall terms, how have you used the additional revenue? 

The law school operated in the past couple of years with a substantial surplus.  Furthermore, we imposed an 8% tuition increase this year.  Thus, the school is able to absorb the projected base budget reductions without affecting the current level of services to students and faculty, and no planned initiatives will have to be delayed or terminated.  Indeed the law school is going forward with plans to hire new faculty and staff.

The law school did not experience any meaningful increase in enrollment.  Our enrollment is at or near capacity given the size of our building and classrooms, so there will be little fluctuation in total enrollment in the years ahead.

2) To achieve the campus goal of doubling the numbers of undergraduate students completing baccalaureate degrees, and to increase the number graduating in four years, what changes have you implemented or planned to implement in course scheduling, curriculum, student support etc.?

The law school has no undergraduate students so this question is not relevant to it.

3) Do you currently have

  • school-based space and
  • centrally-scheduled space
  • to support an increase in credit hours without a significant investment?  Are you investigating methods to use space more effectively

    • on Fridays and weekends? 
    • with online/hybrid/distance education course offerings? 
    • by developing larger classrooms?

The law school occupies its own building (Inlow Hall) and fully utilizes it.  Except for a rare isolated single event, all law school classes and events are held in Inlow Hall, which we control and schedule, and no classes or events by other campus units are held in Inlow Hall, with rare isolated exceptions.  As best we can determine, we are utilizing the space in Inlow Hall to near capacity.  The few Monday through Friday time blocks in which any classrooms are not being utilized for scheduled classes are usually being used for meetings of various kinds and one-time events.  In fact, some smaller enrollment classes, particularly in the evening, are currently being held in law firm conference rooms downtown because there is not sufficient classroom space available in Inlow Hall.

Although we do offer one on-line and one distance education course, these are offered because of unique opportunities that have presented themselves and not because of a conscious effort on our part to develop them.  As of today, we have not systematically considered or tried to develop on-line or distance education courses, although occasionally it is mentioned as something that we might want to consider in the future.  There is very little of that type of course being offered in legal education in the U.S., perhaps in part because when such courses are offered they have to conform to strict standards imposed by the ABA, our accrediting agency.

4) What are your priorities for student technology support, and what progress has been made as you have worked with UITS staff this year to implement your technology plans?

The law school’s priorities for student technology support are to provide internal assistance for students to connect to the IU wireless network, distribute and assist with installation concerns for the designated exam software required for law students to type their exams, and to provide day-to-day support with student laptop problems. We also provide classroom A/V equipment and support for students when presentations are being made. UITS does not play a significant role in the implementation of our internal IT support services, however they do provide service to our students concerning email and university supported systems.


Liberal Arts

1) How are you dealing with the projected base budget reductions for 2009-10 and 2010-11?
  • How will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students and faculty? Will some planned initiatives related to teaching and learning, research and scholarship, and civic engagement have to be delayed or terminated?
  • If your unit experienced enrollment increases during the Summer II and/or fall terms, how have you used the additional revenue? 

At this point (1/7/10), without a specific reduction target yet in hand, we are preparing a combination of actions that will allow us to meet the targets we receive.  These include: 1) not replacing some faculty who have left during the past twelve months or whose departure is anticipated in the next six months; 2) discontinuing some faculty searches that were approved earlier; 3) reconsidering the level of school financial support for some centers or programs; 4) delaying the implementation of new academic programs; and 5) discontinuing some course releases that have been granted to full-time faculty for administrative or other service duties.

 

Current levels of service will be affected by these actions, especially the staffing of some courses for particular majors or minors and certificates within the school.  New initiatives will be affected too, particularly through the delayed implementation of some new programs.

 

Liberal Arts did experience enrollment increases in Summer II and Fall 2009.  The additional revenue has been used in four primary ways, two of which were driven by the enrollment increases themselves.  Our expenditures for part-time faculty to teach additional sections, and our expenditures for student financial aid, are up.  Third, we are preparing for the additional expense of the $300 grants to full-time resident undergraduate students with high grade-point averages.  Fourth, we are trying to maintain some of the additional revenue to aid in the transition to lower budget allocations in the remainder of FY 2010 and in FY 2011.

2) To achieve the campus goal of doubling the numbers of undergraduate students completing baccalaureate degrees, and to increase the number graduating in four years, what changes have you implemented or planned to implement in course scheduling, curriculum, student support etc.?

All degree granting programs have produced four year curricular plans including versions that use summer enrollment. To support this, we are encouraging departments to schedule more alternative-format and summer classes and to examine their curricula and enrollment patterns to identify “bottleneck” courses or requirements that may impede students’ progress toward degree completion. We have also instituted a career development program within the Office of Student Affairs to aid students in connecting their undergraduate academic careers with their longer-term interests and in locating internships and other opportunities that enhance their educational experience as well as preparing them for the transition to life after graduation. We have also developed a robust orientation program for transfer students who constitute nearly sixty percent of our student body and have enhanced our orientation program for first-time students to more effectively articulate with our school’s first year (and first semester) programming. Finally, we have worked to increase work study opportunities within the school and grown scholarship support for undergraduate students to more than $250,000 a year. Many of these scholarships are tied in to RISE initiatives, supporting experiential learning through research, international study, service learning, and/or internships.

3) Do you currently have

  • school-based space and
  • centrally-scheduled space
  • to support an increase in credit hours without a significant investment?  Are you investigating methods to use space more effectively

    • on Fridays and weekends? 
    • with online/hybrid/distance education course offerings? 
    • by developing larger classrooms?

We do not have enough space (school-based or centrally-scheduled) to accommodate much of an increase in credit hours without a significant investment. We are, therefore, taking a number of steps—none of which will fully address the need for additional classroom space, but which may help to a limited degree in the short term. One is the increased offering of online and hybrid courses that do not require classroom space as often throughout the semester. A second is the use of alternative schedule formats (such as13-week classes that start two weeks after other semester classes) which tend to push classes out of the traditional Monday-through-Thursday time blocks and into Fridays. A third is the use of a Learning Environments grant to transform a non-academic space in the basement of Cavanaugh Hall into a classroom.

4) What are your priorities for student technology support, and what progress has been made as you have worked with UITS staff this year to implement your technology plans?

We have two principal priorities for student technology support. One is to maintain the technical services and facilities that we developed over several years to support student learning in a variety of courses and programs—for example, the composition-by-computer classrooms used by students in the Writing Program, the language labs used by students in our world languages and our American Sign Language Interpreting programs, the social sciences lab used by students in research-related courses in the social sciences including geographic information science (GIS) classes, the Speaker’s Lab used by students in Communication Studies R110 and other courses, and the ComTech Lab used by students in telecommunication courses. The second is to relocate several of those facilities to the basement of Cavanaugh Hall where the equipment could be sustained longer (climate control in particular would be simpler in windowless facilities) and where staffing of multiple adjacent labs near the offices of the technical services staff would be more efficient.

These student support services and facilities in Liberal Arts were developed and maintained using student technology fee revenue. During 2009, we worked with UITS staff to keep those services and facilities funded with student technology fee revenue for 2009-2010. We hope to be able to continue to do so, as well as to achieve the above-mentioned transition of facilities within Cavanaugh Hall, in 2010-2011 and beyond.
 


Lilly Family School of Philanthropy

1) How are you dealing with the projected base budget reductions for 2009-10 and 2010-11?
  • How will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students and faculty? Will some planned initiatives related to teaching and learning, research and scholarship, and civic engagement have to be delayed or terminated?
  • If your unit experienced enrollment increases during the Summer II and/or fall terms, how have you used the additional revenue? 

 

·         Graduate fellowships—both the number of fellowships and the amount of money that can be offered per fellowship--have had to be reduced. This significantly affects matriculation of top-quality students interested in our graduate degree programs.

·         Our Student Services travel budget has been cut in half, reducing opportunities for student recruitment.

·         The level of support we provide to faculty, such as office support, could be affected.

·         A portion of our Student Services staff is supported by tuition. If the incumbents should happen to leave their positions, these positions could be compromised by the directive to cut base salary in half if a position becomes vacant. This would have a major impact on our ability to deliver services to our students.

·         We did not experience enrollment increases for the Summer II or fall terms.

 

2) To achieve the campus goal of doubling the numbers of undergraduate students completing baccalaureate degrees, and to increase the number graduating in four years, what changes have you implemented or planned to implement in course scheduling, curriculum, student support etc.?

The Center on Philanthropy and the School of Liberal Arts have developed a new undergraduate major in Philanthropic Studies at IUPUI which has been approved by the IU Trustees.  Pending final approval by the Indiana Higher Education Commission, the B.A. degree in Philanthropic Studies is expected to enroll its first students in the fall semester 2010. Courses that would count toward the degree are already available to undergraduates. If approved, we anticipate that this new bachelor’s degree program will attract additional new undergraduates from the Central Indiana community, across the state and around the nation, as well as attracting significant interest internationally.

3) Do you currently have

  • school-based space and
  • centrally-scheduled space
  • to support an increase in credit hours without a significant investment?  Are you investigating methods to use space more effectively

    • on Fridays and weekends? 
    • with online/hybrid/distance education course offerings? 
    • by developing larger classrooms?

 

Because we are not a school, the Center does not schedule or manage class space.  Space for our classes is arranged by the School of Liberal Arts and SPEA.

4) What are your priorities for student technology support, and what progress has been made as you have worked with UITS staff this year to implement your technology plans?

The Center does not provide direct student technology support and does not receive student tech fee support funding.  We rely upon the School of Liberal Arts and SPEA, via UITS, for student technology support.


Medicine

1) How are you dealing with the projected base budget reductions for 2009-10 and 2010-11?
  • How will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students and faculty? Will some planned initiatives related to teaching and learning, research and scholarship, and civic engagement have to be delayed or terminated?
  • If your unit experienced enrollment increases during the Summer II and/or fall terms, how have you used the additional revenue? 

IUSM's share of the campus base reduction of $10.6 million was $4.08 million.  IUSM was able to utilize increases in tuition and indirect cost recoveries to meet its obligations on the Indianapolis campus for FY 2010.  Although no salary increases were granted in FY 2010, no positions were eliminated due to this reduction, and on-going academic programs and initatives have so far not been sacrificed.  However, to-date there has been almost $500,000 eliminated from the base travel budget, over $800,000 from supplies and expense budgets, and $850,000 in base funding eliminated from staff compensation.  Although this does not directly cut into academic programs, it further erodes the school's administrative infrastructure and its ability to provide critical services, such as pre-award grant proposal support, to faculty.       

Perhaps far more significant is the issue of funding for the medical school expansion.  FY 2010 is the third year of this 30% expansion of medical student enrollment.  The purpose of this expansion is to train more physicians in Indiana to fill a growing shortfall, particularly in rural and other underserved areas of the state.  Studies show that the majority of physicians practice in or close to the communities in which they trained as either students or residents.  Because of this, the enrollment expansion has been taking place primarily at the eight regional medical campuses around the state.  This 30% expansion would increase class size from 280 to 364, at the rate of 14 additional students per year for each of six years.  Total enrollment would increase from 1,120 up to 1,456 at total implementation.  FY 2010 marks the halfway point with 322 first year students admitted in August 2009.

Significant time and funds have been invested in this initiative.  In spring 2009 the Indiana General Assembly appropriated approximately $3 million of base funding to the State Budget Agency to fund this program.  Due to the state's current fiscal crisis this funding now appears to be in jeopardy and IUSM is evaluating how many students it will be able to afford to admit in 2010 if funding is not forthcoming. 

Because of the medical school expansion program, there have been additional revenues earned.  These revenues are being directed to the budgets of the regional medical campuses and the central educational support units, but are not enough to cover the increased costs related to the expansion.

2) To achieve the campus goal of doubling the numbers of undergraduate students completing baccalaureate degrees, and to increase the number graduating in four years, what changes have you implemented or planned to implement in course scheduling, curriculum, student support etc.?

IUSM has around 330 undergraduate students.  The issues addressed in this question have not been problems for IUSM's undergraduate programs.  

3) Do you currently have

  • school-based space and
  • centrally-scheduled space
  • to support an increase in credit hours without a significant investment?  Are you investigating methods to use space more effectively

    • on Fridays and weekends? 
    • with online/hybrid/distance education course offerings? 
    • by developing larger classrooms?

As mentioned in Question 1 above, IUSM's increase in credit hours has been from the medical school expansion which has taken place almost entirely on the regional medical campuses. Gross Anatomy teaching laboratories have been expanded and additional anatomy tables added where necessary to accomodate the expansion students.  The South Bend and Ft. Wayne campuses have new buildings, with more than adequate space.

In terms of Indianapolis based undergraduate programs, space is adequate.  However, in terms of medical student teaching,  as well as research and administrative space on the Indianapolis campus, IUSM is at or beyond capacity and badly in need of additional space.  

4) What are your priorities for student technology support, and what progress has been made as you have worked with UITS staff this year to implement your technology plans?

IUSM generally manages student technology issues within the school, rather than through UITS.  Priorities for FY 2010 (i.e. spanding plan) includes:

Total anticipated recurring expenses: $104,875  (pagers, half of CERTTS position, hardware/software support for Mediasite system, etc.)

Anticipated AV upgrade − MS 122A, MS 326, MS B13 and MS B14
                                   
Total estimated cost:  $173,864

Screen filters for the testing center: $13,920

Cable locks and surge suppressors for the testing center computers: $5225

AV upgrade for histology labs (MS 109-117): $70,000

Planning is underway for these projects.


Nursing

1) How are you dealing with the projected base budget reductions for 2009-10 and 2010-11?
  • How will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students and faculty? Will some planned initiatives related to teaching and learning, research and scholarship, and civic engagement have to be delayed or terminated?
  • If your unit experienced enrollment increases during the Summer II and/or fall terms, how have you used the additional revenue? 

From a conceptual standpoint, we believe that the School of Nursing, as an organization, is in an excellent position to address these challenges. We have systems in place to provide us with the financial data to make the difficult decisions that need to be made to transform the way we implement our mission in order to meet the financial constraints placed on us in this economic downturn. This data includes individual faculty workloads, program and course costs, etc. The data will be transparent and shared, through our School’s Administrative Leadership Group and the Budgetary Affairs Committee as well as at monthly all faculty and staff meetings that the Dean holds. Everyone will be invited to provide input and to participate in discussions.  We are convinced that the faculty and staff can meet this challenge and use their combined and considerable talents to help address the fiscal reductions while ensuring the core missions for our future and for the future of Indiana’s health.  

 

From a technical/mechanical standpoint, the 2009-10 reductions thus far were met with a combination of cash, two FTE staff reductions (via retirement and closure of a center), increased indirect cost recovery, decreased travel, conversion of three full-time staff positions to .5 (at the time of the incumbent’s resignation) and pulling the funding from some of our academic vacant positions. The proposed base budget reduction for 2010-11 would be met with a combination of projected increased graduate student instructional fees, projected increased clinical fees, additional pullback from academic vacancies, and careful management of backfilling positions vacated through normal attrition.

 

a.       How will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students and faculty? As long as the projected reductions are in the ranges that have already been made known to us, we should be able to continue our current level of service using the strategies outlined above.

 

Will some planned initiatives related to teaching and learning, research and scholarship, and civic engagement have to be delayed or terminated?  Not as long as the projected reductions are in the ranges that have already been made known to us, those in Fall 2009.

 

b.      If your unit experienced enrollment increases during the Summer II and/or fall terms, how have you used the additional revenue?  The majority of any cash (unbudgeted) increases have been set aside for the planned renovation of the 4th floor of the building.

2) To achieve the campus goal of doubling the numbers of undergraduate students completing baccalaureate degrees, and to increase the number graduating in four years, what changes have you implemented or planned to implement in course scheduling, curriculum, student support etc.?

The vast majority of our undergraduate students complete their baccalaureate degrees as this is a requirement to sit for the NCLEX (RN licensing exam). We have a substantial student support staff as well (advisors, tutors, etc.).

3) Do you currently have

  • school-based space and
  • centrally-scheduled space
  • to support an increase in credit hours without a significant investment?  Are you investigating methods to use space more effectively

    • on Fridays and weekends? 
    • with online/hybrid/distance education course offerings? 
    • by developing larger classrooms?

        a.    on Fridays and weekends?  The classrooms in the building are nearly always scheduled.

        b.    with online/hybrid/distance education course offerings? We are one of the pioneer schools in offering distance education courses, with an all online RN-BSN proposed, all graduate core courses offered online, an online DNP beginning in Fall 2010, and a distance accessible PhD program. 

        c.     by developing larger classrooms? The only way to make any of the classrooms larger in this building would be to combine smaller classrooms into larger ones, thus requiring significant funds from the campus.

4) What are your priorities for student technology support, and what progress has been made as you have worked with UITS staff this year to implement your technology plans?

 We are committed to providing the highest level of student technology support. In addition to that provided by UITS, the School supports audio visual, web conferencing and videoconferencing. We also provide desktop, laptop, and mobile device support; server and storage systems support; application development; simulation support; and student training and development. We recently opened a new $2 million state-of-the-art student learning environment, the Resource Center for Innovation in Clinical Nursing Education. Designed to provide an innovative teaching and learning environment for the development of clinical skills in undergraduate and graduate nursing students, it houses the latest in high-fidelity simulation technology.  In addition, we house one of many public computer clusters available on campus. We are also committed financially: $300,000 annually to support the Interdisciplinary Simulation Center in Fairbanks Hall which houses numerous types of sophisticated technologies that will require continually updating and replacement.


Physical Education

1) How are you dealing with the projected base budget reductions for 2009-10 and 2010-11?
  • How will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students and faculty? Will some planned initiatives related to teaching and learning, research and scholarship, and civic engagement have to be delayed or terminated?
  • If your unit experienced enrollment increases during the Summer II and/or fall terms, how have you used the additional revenue? 

The School of Physical Education and Tourism Management (PETM) is achieving the base budget reductions through a combination of reductions in our unallocated line item and reductions in travel for faculty, adjunct faculty hiring, and printing and duplicating.

 

At the current time (prior to the next round of cuts yet to be announced), the base reductions will have only very limited impact on our ability to deliver our current level of services to students and faculty.  The one exception is with respect to travel restrictions.  As one of our programs is Tourism, Conventions and Events Management (TCEM), this faculty needs to travel in order to attend conferences and conduct research.  These activities have been reducedd given the budget reductions and further reductions to their travel budget could negatively impact their development.

 

We experienced a slight increase in revenue from student fees above what was budgeted in the Fall of 2009.  This money is being set aside to fund the student refunds mandated by the President’s Office in order to satisfy the state legislature.

2) To achieve the campus goal of doubling the numbers of undergraduate students completing baccalaureate degrees, and to increase the number graduating in four years, what changes have you implemented or planned to implement in course scheduling, curriculum, student support etc.?

The fall semester of 2009 was spent engaging the faculty and staff in charting the strategic directions of the school for the next four years.  One of the mandates that emerged from this process is an examination of all programs and tracks to ensure that we are doing everything possible to ensure our students are able to graduate in four years.  Specifically, we are exploring curricular revision with the goal of having a maximum of 124 credits for any track.  This may not be possible in Physical Education/Teacher Education because of School of Education requirements and because we prepare students to graduate with credentials in both physical education and health education.  Nonetheless, we should be able to reduce the existing requirements of that track.

 

While we would like to explore more centralized advising, that option is currently not available due to budgetary constraints.  However, PETM is always exploring ways to further increase its student population.  We have seen steady growth and interest in our young sport management program offering and believe that with significant curricular revision in 2010, we could see a large growth in credit hours for our school.   The exercise science track has also experienced steady growth in credit hours and further potential in development of the track is possible.

3) Do you currently have

  • school-based space and
  • centrally-scheduled space
  • to support an increase in credit hours without a significant investment?  Are you investigating methods to use space more effectively

    • on Fridays and weekends? 
    • with online/hybrid/distance education course offerings? 
    • by developing larger classrooms?

The School of Physical Education and Tourism Management has employed the following strategies to manage the significant growth it has experienced over the past five years:

 

·         Divided the Department of Tourism, Conventions, and Event Management faculty between the Natatorium and an off-site location on Waterway Boulevard.  This has not added classroom space, but has added to our ability to support students in advising and provide each full-time FTE faculty member with a private office.

·         Offered classes both face-to-face and online, particularly in the Department of Tourism, Conventions and Events Management (increased our capacity to generate credit hours)

·         Developed relationships with both IU-East and IUPUI-Columbus to offer classes in our TCEM curriculum to their students.

·         Converted a faculty office to a research lab to facilitate more interaction of our students with research initiatives.

·         Increased class sizes where possible. We will continue to explore this option as we also attempt to reduce the teaching load of research active faculty

 

The school has seen a leveling of its overall growth in 2009.  However, deeper analysis shows that the Department of Physical Education’s enrollment has increased while Tourism, Conventions and Events Management has decreased.  Therefore, we are continually exploring ways to support the increase in credit hours in the Department of Physical Education.

4) What are your priorities for student technology support, and what progress has been made as you have worked with UITS staff this year to implement your technology plans?

With the change in policy with respect to the distribution of undergraduate student technology fees, PETM had two objectives: 1) ensure the current level of student access to technology through our consortium with the School of Education and School of Social Work; and 2) Maintain our 1 FTE dedicated to IT.  Through several conversations with UITS, we have reached an agreement to gradually phase out their financial support for the 1 FTE we have in-house for technology support.   In three years, our school will fund 100% of this position.  The funding of this position is vital to our achievement of work related to technology.  It is assumed that the transition of the consortium computer labs to UITS managed labs will be seamless in the student’s eyes.


Planning and Institutional Improvement

1) How are you dealing with the projected base budget reductions for 2009-10 and 2010-11? For instance, how will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students, faculty, and staff? Will some planned initiatives have to be delayed or terminated?

The office of Information Management and Institutional Research lost a data analyst and did not have the funds to hire a replacement.  This means that fewer requests from deans, directors, and vice chancellors for information to inform decisions can be accepted.  Further cuts will require eliminating the graduate assistantships that enable IMIR to conduct surveys of continuing students, alumni, and employers--an important source of management information.

In the Testing Center, a reorganization recommended following an audit by HR staff resulted in the downgrading of a position.  Now that the incumbent, who was earning more than the new position warrants, has retired, this salary savings coupled with a delay in purchasing needed replacement computers for the testing lab has enabled the Testing Center to meet current budget-cutting obligations.  Further cuts may lead to the elimination of the scanning function, which would leave some 15 campus units without assestance in scoring both paper-based and Web-based course evaluations.  Taking that function back into departments and schools will require equipment and staff time; the alternative is to purchase the service from a commercial vendor, which is much more expensive than the service the Testing Center currently provides. 

In the office of Planning and Institutional Improvement, we are relying more and more on soft money--royalties from periodicals and books written and edited by staff, and conference proceeds--for operating expenses.  Further cuts will decimate our program review account, making it necessary for us to ask departments to pay all the costs of their reviews (they currently pay half), or to conduct fewer reviews for academic and administrative units. 


Public & Environmental Affairs

1) How are you dealing with the projected base budget reductions for 2009-10 and 2010-11?
  • How will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students and faculty? Will some planned initiatives related to teaching and learning, research and scholarship, and civic engagement have to be delayed or terminated?
  • If your unit experienced enrollment increases during the Summer II and/or fall terms, how have you used the additional revenue? 
a.       How will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students and faculty? Will some planned initiatives related to teaching and learning, research and scholarship, and civic engagement have to be delayed or terminated?
As a result of the projected base reductions, we suspended our search to fill the vacant Public Affairs position and have utilized Associate Faculty members to teach those courses thereby filling in the gaps. We hope to have a new graduate degree approved by the ICHE this spring. A search for a faculty member related to this proposed degree was cancelled.
 
b.      If your unit experienced enrollment increases during the Summer II and/or fall terms, how have you used the additional revenue? 
We were slightly under budget for these terms: no excess revenue was generated in summer II and fall semesters.

2) To achieve the campus goal of doubling the numbers of undergraduate students completing baccalaureate degrees, and to increase the number graduating in four years, what changes have you implemented or planned to implement in course scheduling, curriculum, student support etc.?

We have:
·         Posted 4-year course rotation matrices and a 4-year plan for every major.
·         Invited all students who attain 86 hours to meet with an advisor and complete a audit.
·         Delivered information sessions to direct admit students that focused on student success, degree requirements, minors, certificates, policies, SPEA faculty, internship and professional development opportunities.
·         Offered a “Career Development and Planning” course with the goal of helping students choose and commit to a professional development plan earlier in their academic careers.
We are planning to:
·         Implement an early warning system for students with less than a 2.3 cumulative grade point average.
·         Identify courses where students experience more difficulties and implement peer supplemental instruction.
·         Develop a SPEA honors society to provide enhanced opportunities for our top students.

3) Do you currently have

  • school-based space and
  • centrally-scheduled space
  • to support an increase in credit hours without a significant investment?  Are you investigating methods to use space more effectively

    • on Fridays and weekends? 
    • with online/hybrid/distance education course offerings? 
    • by developing larger classrooms?

As with most schools on campus, we have very limited space to expand course offerings at the most popular times. We also have difficulty increasing the size of a closed class, because a larger alternative classroom is seldom available. Over the past year we have offered a required undergraduate course on Friday afternoon, developed several online courses, and offered graduate classes in the summer. All of these were successful enough to continue. In addition, we continue to offer some courses in an intensive format, usually in a week-long format or on Fridays. This latter format has been very successful for our one-credit courses.

4) What are your priorities for student technology support, and what progress has been made as you have worked with UITS staff this year to implement your technology plans?

We have decided, in consultation with UITS, to maintain our student computer lab. UITS staff has worked with us to develop a plan for maintenance of this space. We are currently developing a plan for the use of STF funds under the revised policy.

Research, Vice Chancellor

1) How are you dealing with the projected base budget reductions for 2009-10 and 2010-11? For instance, how will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students, faculty, and staff? Will some planned initiatives have to be delayed or terminated?

To deal with the budget reductions, I have examined the services and expenditures associated with my unit, and have reduced expenditures in those areas that as much as possible would not impact the quality of services provided.  I am also planning to possibly use some reserve funds associated with my office to minimize delay or termination of some planned initiatives.

 


School of Library and Information Sciences

1) How are you dealing with the projected base budget reductions for 2009-10 and 2010-11?
  • How will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students and faculty? Will some planned initiatives related to teaching and learning, research and scholarship, and civic engagement have to be delayed or terminated?
  • If your unit experienced enrollment increases during the Summer II and/or fall terms, how have you used the additional revenue? 

2) To achieve the campus goal of doubling the numbers of undergraduate students completing baccalaureate degrees, and to increase the number graduating in four years, what changes have you implemented or planned to implement in course scheduling, curriculum, student support etc.?

3) Do you currently have

  • school-based space and
  • centrally-scheduled space
  • to support an increase in credit hours without a significant investment?  Are you investigating methods to use space more effectively

    • on Fridays and weekends? 
    • with online/hybrid/distance education course offerings? 
    • by developing larger classrooms?

4) What are your priorities for student technology support, and what progress has been made as you have worked with UITS staff this year to implement your technology plans?


Science

1) How are you dealing with the projected base budget reductions for 2009-10 and 2010-11?
  • How will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students and faculty? Will some planned initiatives related to teaching and learning, research and scholarship, and civic engagement have to be delayed or terminated?
  • If your unit experienced enrollment increases during the Summer II and/or fall terms, how have you used the additional revenue? 

State base funding for the School of Science has steadily declined over the past decade, and it now accounts for about 11% of the school’s total income.  If the projected base budget reduction is distributed proportionally among units, and if there is no increase in assessment, Science will try to offset the projected base budget reduction and maintain its current level of operation with tuition revenue generated by the anticipated rise in our credit hours.  However, we will very likely have to slow down our effort to rebuild our faculty and to expand it to meet the needs of our rising enrollment, especially in Biology and Chemistry.  This is a very significant concern.

As we have done in the past two years, we will use the additional revenue to (1) fund new faculty start-up costs; (2) fund internal proposals from Science faculty to improve or replace some of the school’s out-dated core equipment or facilities that would benefit multiple departments or multiple investigators, especially newly hired and funded faculty; (3) build up a reserve for the immediate renovation or repurposing of some of the existing space in SL and LD that would be freed up when the new Science–Engineering Research Complex (SERC) comes on line.

2) To achieve the campus goal of doubling the numbers of undergraduate students completing baccalaureate degrees, and to increase the number graduating in four years, what changes have you implemented or planned to implement in course scheduling, curriculum, student support etc.?

All seven departments in Science are already offering a broad range of courses during both summer sessions to ensure that our majors as well as students from other schools will have the opportunity to make academic progress during the summer.  To the extent our continuing lack of instructional laboratory space would permit (see our answer to Question 3 below), every department is monitoring and refining its course scheduling on a continuous basis to ensure that its offerings are meeting student demand, and that there will be no chokepoint that would impede student progress.

Using the new Science program fee, we are in the process of setting up a new Office of Student Services that will (1) accelerate the recruitment of high-ability students; (2) provide better services—such as advising and career counseling—to increase the retention and graduation rates; (3) develop more internships, externships, and research opportunities for our undergraduates.

On the curriculum front, our faculty submitted a proposal last fall to the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) to support transformative changes in undergraduate science education.  There is also an ongoing discussion among our faculty on the development of new interdisciplinary undergraduate degree programs that can leverage the collective academic strengths of as many departments as possible—for example, neuroscience and computational science.  All these efforts are aimed at making our academic programs more attractive to high-ability and serious-minded undergraduates, and could help attract more science majors and improve our four-year graduation rate long-term.

3) Do you currently have

  • school-based space and
  • centrally-scheduled space
  • to support an increase in credit hours without a significant investment?  Are you investigating methods to use space more effectively

    • on Fridays and weekends? 
    • with online/hybrid/distance education course offerings? 
    • by developing larger classrooms?

The simple answer to the above question is NO.  Space, or more specifically school-based laboratory space, continues to be the single biggest roadblock to the growth of our academic programs.  We have absolutely “maxed out” on our ability (irrespective of hours of the day, or days of the week) to offer more lab sections in almost all the foundational courses in Biology and Chemistry.  Courses requiring laboratory work cannot be easily adapted to an online or distant education format.  This in turn has resulted in long wait-lists every semester for many of these courses.

The situation with Chemistry will improve beginning Spring 2010 after we repurposed some space in LD and turned it into an instructional lab for organic chemistry.  In the long run, the proposed Science-Engineering Research Complex (SERC), once it comes on one, will enable us to renovate and repurpose of some of the existing space in SL and LD for instructional use.

4) What are your priorities for student technology support, and what progress has been made as you have worked with UITS staff this year to implement your technology plans?

Using income from student technology fees, the School of Science has developed and maintained a testing center that serves a large of number of students, both within and outside the school, taking introductory courses in psychology, chemistry, physics, and mathematics.  Now that UITS has taken over the administration of the student technology fees, we are in negotiation with UITS to ensure that there will continue to be adequate support for the center and that students across our campus will be well served by the center.

 

We have also engaged UITS in a discussion on the development of a Student Advising Scheduling System that we believe could greatly facilitate communication between students and their advisors.  This web-based system would enable an advisor (or faculty member) to publish his or her availability (i.e., a block of time on his or her calendar) so that a student can make an appointment conveniently online.  The student’s request will then be automatically entered into Microsoft Outlook or any other calendar software that the advisor is using.  After the appointment, the system would send a request to the student to fill out a quick multiple-choice survey (plus room for comments). The responses from students could then be included in a data base that is accessible to, say, only the department chair or dean.  The information can be used for performance assessment or for developing ways to improve our advising effort.

 


Social Work

1) How are you dealing with the projected base budget reductions for 2009-10 and 2010-11?
  • How will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students and faculty? Will some planned initiatives related to teaching and learning, research and scholarship, and civic engagement have to be delayed or terminated?
  • If your unit experienced enrollment increases during the Summer II and/or fall terms, how have you used the additional revenue? 

Our Fiscal Year 2010 budget had included reserves for a clerical position, Philanthropy student to assist with development work, and a lecturer position.  The clerical reserve and Philanthropy student reserve have been eliminated.  The lecturer position has been changed to a tenure track faculty position.  Social Work received an increase in our tuition rates for FY2010 which will bring in some additional revenue.  We are taking dramatic steps to curb expenses and monitor expenses and are striving to maximize our existing resources.

Estimated annual excess for Fall 2009 was approximately $68,600 over budget.  These funds will be used for salary support for Abebaw Gezie, a visiting faculty from Addis Ababa University in Ethiopia, which had not been included as part of our original budget.  The remainder will go to support the Student Incentive Grants for those resident undergrad students with a B or better cumulative GPA and to address budget cuts.

2) To achieve the campus goal of doubling the numbers of undergraduate students completing baccalaureate degrees, and to increase the number graduating in four years, what changes have you implemented or planned to implement in course scheduling, curriculum, student support etc.?

The program conducts information sessions for University College advisors on a regular basis in order to inform them of degree requirements. The BSW program changed the admissions criteria from 26 credits to 12 credits to provide academic degree advising within the School of Social Work early in the students’ educational career. When students enter the program, they are assigned a faculty member as advisor and mentor. Also, the Student Services Coordinator acts as advisor to students in the program and to those exploring social work. When students enter the program, they are given an individualized educational plan based on the credit hours students plan to take. These plans are subject to change based on students’ circumstances. 

The BSW Program is completing the coding of the BSW degree requirements in the campus template to provide instant information to students about requirements, transfer of credits, and progress toward the completion of the degree. The program publishes its degree requirements in the admissions packet, website, and the BSW student handbook.

The BSW program offers a Diversity course combined with a Thematic Learning Community. As they say, learning communities show a positive impact in retention as well as on graduation. Another area that increases success is honors courses. In November, I met with the Dean of the Honors College and Dr. Mullen to discuss the development of  a strong honors option for our students. We agreed that we would work on the plan this semester. If the report is uploaded we can wait until next year to report.

 

An adequate number of courses are offered every semester to keep students on track for their degrees. Overall, the program is designed in such a way that students can graduate in four years, should they want to attend school full time.

3) Do you currently have

  • school-based space and
  • centrally-scheduled space
  • to support an increase in credit hours without a significant investment?  Are you investigating methods to use space more effectively

    • on Fridays and weekends? 
    • with online/hybrid/distance education course offerings? 
    • by developing larger classrooms?

School-based space includes three conference rooms which are generally limited to meetings or exceptional cases when classes have guest speakers. All classes utilize centrally-scheduled space. The School already offers its curriculum on Saturdays and during the evenings and through online and hybrid courses. More attention is being devoted to the development of online courses in the graduate program and online delivery is already standard in both the BSW and Labor Studies programs. The School will give serious attention to increasing class sizes as a strategy to reduce costly course overload pay while at the same time recruiting more students.

4) What are your priorities for student technology support, and what progress has been made as you have worked with UITS staff this year to implement your technology plans?

The School currently utilizes centrally-controlled computer classroom space as well as maintains 2 small computer labs. Social work students have access to all software used in their classes and can print documents at no cost. In addition, the School has 3 videotaping rooms where students can simulate and record individual and group counseling sessions for class assignments.


Student Life

1) How are you dealing with the projected base budget reductions for 2009-10 and 2010-11? For instance, how will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students, faculty, and staff? Will some planned initiatives have to be delayed or terminated?

Division of Student Life: Response to Supplemental Question on APBR

(See attachment list for a version of this document in MS Word format) 

Item

Cost Reduction

Revenue Generation

Facilities

Intramural and Recreational Sports: Reduce hours of operation for the weight room; eliminate summer open gym hours ($5,000)

 

Fees

 

Increase revenue by increasing the occupancy in Ball Residence Hall by 2 additional students above the planned amount

Fees

 

Increase revenue by increasing the housing application fee by 11%

Fees

 

Increase revenue by re-assigning one Guest Apartment and making it available for student occupants

Services

Reduce the number of free flu shots for students ($2,400)

 

Staff

Reduce support staff in Vice Chancellor’s office by .5FTE ($16,000)

 

Staff

Reduce compensation packages for graduate assistants ($10,000)

 

Staff

Reduce available CAPS clinical service by .5FTE by not filling a vacant full time position but instead employing part time clinicians ($13,000)

 

Staff

Campus Center: Increase the number of required work-study eligible student employee positions and reduce the number of student employee shifts ($15,000)

 

Travel

Reduce professional development  funds for each staff member by 50% ($30,000)

 

 


University College


University Information Technology Services

1) How are you dealing with the projected base budget reductions for 2009-10 and 2010-11? For instance, how will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students, faculty, and staff? Will some planned initiatives have to be delayed or terminated?

The final base budget adjustment to meet UITS target is ZZ7853910.
 
Our target was $322,957. We satisfied 31% of the cut with mandatory travel reductions.  To manage within this reduced travel budget we are looking at alternate means for training, including video links to conferences, and bringing trainers on site when feasible.  We are carefully reviewing all travel, and also trying to maximize carpooling between IUB and IUPUI.
 
Three positions were vacated at UITS in the past four months that are funding in whole or in part by IUPUI GF.  Every vacancy is being carefully collectively reviewed by UITS management prior to filling, and responsibilities are being spread among existing staff, or when feasible, eliminated.
 
Over the past several years, in various forms, UITS has internally managed an Expenditure Review Committee (ERC) initiative.  The purpose of ERC is for all units within UITS to be constantly reviewing services provided, and identifying ways to deliver services more efficiently, or to reduce or eliminate services no longer deemed crucial.  Funds culled from ERC initiatives are held centrally by UITS to self-fund new high priority initiatives, including the priorities outlined by the University Community in the latest strategic plan for IT at IU (Empowering People).  To meet our targeted budget reduction we have used $170K of funds gathered from mandated ERC reductions.  This will slow or reduce the number of other priority UTIS initiatives that we are able to deploy.


University Library

1) How are you dealing with the projected base budget reductions for 2009-10 and 2010-11? For instance, how will the projected base reductions affect your ability to deliver your current level of services to students, faculty, and staff? Will some planned initiatives have to be delayed or terminated?

The University Library will make the following cuts to meet its 2009/10 target of $185,986.  The cuts for 2010/11 have yet to be allocated so it is unclear what the University Library portion of the cuts will be.

To meet the 2009/10 cuts we will:

Travel will be cut by $18,000.  Life cycle funding will be cut by $20,000.  This is made possible in part by the declining price of computer equipment and in part by our migration to the UITS Intelligent Infrastructure.  The latter will save costs on servers.  $10,000 will be cut from S&E.

The library will take the following cuts in compensation.  We will cut two of our five graduate assistant positions for a savings of $23,200.  We will cut the diversity fellows program for a savings of $13,000.  We will pursue external funds to continue this program.  We will cut $38,000 in hourly wages.  This may entail reductions in hours or other service reductions.  We will cut two clerical positions, which will be a savings of $32,000 each, including savings on fringe benefits, for a total savings of $64,000.  We hope to be able to create these vacancies through attrition, but will need to RIF positions if vacancies do not occur.   We have not yet identified the specific positions to be cut and will wait until the actual cuts are required to do so. 

Some services cuts may result with this reduction in force.  The most likely service reductions will be for service desks and computer consultants.  It may be necessary to consider some reductions in hours.  The library would stop accepting most gift books.

We would need to take cuts in 2010/11 in ways that are approximately the same as those in 2009/10.  Assuming that the reductions for 2010/11 are about half of the 2009/10 cuts, the reductions in staffing would likely require cuts in hours and the reduction in life cycle computer funding might begin to effect our ability to maintain current hardware at all of our public locations.